Natural Cleaning Tips For Healthy Living

Create and maintain a clean environment of your very own.

Control Your Clutter–Daily, Weekly & Monthly

Posted on October 16, 2014

I will not let clutter beat me As a professional cleaning company, we advise our clients to clear their homes of clutter before we even arrive.  Easier said than done, right?  With our hectic lives and schedules, managing clutter can seem like an overwhelming task and many people do not know where to begin.

Here are 9 things you can do daily, weekly and monthly to get control of your clutter—instead of the clutter controlling you:

Daily
Do a 30-Minute Clean
Every day, take 30-minutes to get one small part of your home—like a junk drawer or the hallway closet– in order.  Go through items quickly keeping things that you “always use”, storing things that are “used for special occasions” and getting rid of anything you “haven’t used in 6-months.”  You will be amazed at the difference you can make in just 30-minutes each day.

Sort Your Mail by the Recycling Bin
As soon as you get your mail, head over to the recycling bin and immediately discard any unwanted junk mail and fliers.  This will keep those items from piling up on your kitchen table.

Create a “Catch All” Bin
At the end of each day, go through every room in your home and put any item that is out of place—such as the TV remote control that has found its way to the kitchen counter—in a stylish, “catch all” basket (we love this one made of sustainable materials from Land of Nod). As you move from room to room, you can put items back in their rightful places.

Weekly
Donate Items
Designate a box or basket for donations and keep it in a central location that is easily accessible to all family members.  Throughout the week, whenever you run across clothing, sports equipment, toys or household items you do not need, place it in the donation box with the goal of donating at least 10 items per week to your local non-profit agency.

Go Electronic
Use your tech tools to keep papers off of your desk and tables.  Once a week, organize business cards and addresses into an online contact list, put appointments and events in an online calendar system (use a Google calendar to share with all family members), save hard copies of documents to an external hard drive and scan kid art projects to be saved to their own online art gallery (just create a folder in DropBox & share with family members).

Binder It
Create a 3-ring binder for each family member as well as one for bills and recipes.  As soon as loose paper comes into the home, punch holes in the side and place it in the proper binder.  Go through binders weekly and take out those papers that need to be acted on that particular week. Put recipes in clear report covers before placing into binders—this will keep food from getting on the pages.

Monthly
Swap Your Books
All those paperback books you still have sitting in boxes in your storage space?  Swap them.  Head to paperbackswap.com and list the books you would be willing to swap.  Once a book is requested, you simply mail it to the club member.  In return, you can choose from more than 4 million available books to be mailed to you as well.

Expire Your Expiration Dates
One day each month, go through medications, cleaning supplies, cosmetics and food in the fridge to get rid of anything that has gone beyond its expiration date.  This keeps your areas clutter free and healthy—there is nothing worse than having expired medicine or food in your home.

De-Clutter Your Tech
Clean out your email boxes on all your devices, unsubscribe to electronic newsletters you no longer read (head to unroll.me), organize your external hard drive and delete items you no longer need.

Talk to us:  What tips do you have for managing the clutter in your home?

 

image courtesy of flickr/BY CC 2.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home Cleaning Managing Clutter Organization Tips for Being Organized

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Office Cleaning Checklist: Daily, Weekly and Monthly Tasks

Office Cleaning Checklist

During and after the COVID-19 pandemic, maintaining a high standard of hygiene and organization in the office certainly has its benefits — from boosting your employees’ health and morale to increased productivity. However, just as proper planning and keeping to schedules is key to any business’s success, the same is true when cleaning your workspaces. 

A clean office that routinely impresses clients and employees is best achieved by crafting a cleaning plan or office cleaning checklist. Here are some essential tips that may help formulate a professional office cleaning checklist that will make office cleaning and organizing easier to manage.

Try a Basic Office Cleaning Checklist Template 

While each office space may have different needs that should be considered when creating a cleaning plan, most office cleaning checklist templates or office cleaning checklist pdf can find an online break down a cleaning schedule based on daily, weekly, and monthly cleaning tasks. Cleaning under each of these categories will serve to form a good cleaning routine while prioritizing the vital, high-traffic areas around the office as needed.

Daily Cleaning Checklist

Especially after a busy day, every office requires some cleanup and tidying. However, the daily cleaning schedule may not be as in-depth as weekly or monthly routines. The areas that should be cleaned daily by your cleaning crew or staff should include the most frequently visited spaces that attract dirt and messes quickly, including reception areas, restrooms, garbage bins around the office, as well as kitchen or pantry areas. Daily cleaning of such areas can include essential vacuuming, mopping, dusting, and organizing desk spaces.

Weekly Cleaning Tasks

Unlike daily tasks, your office’s weekly cleaning checklist will involve more in-depth functions that are typically needed to be done over weekends by cleaning crews. Weekly cleaning routines are key to maintaining healthy air quality and the environment overall, involving deep cleaning of carpets, restrooms, and the kitchen. Other tasks might include hard floor mopping/polishing/buffing, sanitizing refrigerators and appliances, as well as dusting around cubicles, and window cleaning.

Monthly Cleaning Tasks 

As you might expect, monthly cleaning tasks aren’t required as often but are essential to ensure a healthy office space. Tasks to put on your monthly office cleaning checklist might include in-depth cleaning of HVAC grills and vents, as well as dusting all high surfaces, or challenging to reach areas. Top-down office cleaning might also include all windows and window covers, polishing wooden furniture and hardwood surfaces, and cleaning fabric chairs and upholstery.

Overall, whether you are concerned about keeping an organized workplace to boost productivity day-to-day or concerned about ensuring a safe and sanitary work environment, having a solid checklist will keep you on track. 

Of course, office cleaning checklists can be tailored to meet the unique needs of your office space. Typically, a diligent cleaning company should work with you to identify those needs and craft a plan that fits your schedule and budget. 

For more tips on creating your office cleaning checklist, contact Greenhouse Eco-Cleaning today.

Difference Between Cleaning, Sanitizing and Disinfecting

Not every cleaning job is the same. Even though they may be some overlap, there is a definite difference between cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting your living space. And with each different cleaning job comes different methods for each.

Here, we’ll describe the difference between cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting.

Cleaning

No one should be a stranger to cleaning, but there are some key differences from disinfecting and sanitizing. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cleaning “removes germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces or objects.”

Simply, cleaning can involve using soap, water and detergents to remove dirt, allergens and microorganisms from a surface, which can help reduce the number of germs that can lead to infection. However, cleaning does not necessarily mean the same thing as killing germs. 

When to Clean:

Cleaning can easily be done daily in places like kitchens and many other high-touch areas with visible dirt, dust, fingerprints and other marks using a simple cloth or wipe in conjunction with a detergent, soap and water. Cleaning is also an important first step that makes sanitizing or disinfecting most surfaces or objects area is much easier.

Disinfecting:

Disinfecting is the use of chemicals such as bleach and alcohol solutions to kill germs on surfaces and objects. Unlike cleaning, disinfecting does not guarantee dirt, germs, and impurities are being removed from surfaces. However, killing germs does lower the risk of spreading infection.

When to disinfect:

It's recommended using an EPA-registered disinfectant on high-touch surfaces like toilet handles or sinks regularly. Note, however, a key difference between disinfecting and sanitizing is both the chemicals involved and the length of time you need to let them sit on a surface. About 10 minutes is the appropriate dwell time for most disinfectants, but follow the product’s label instructions.

Sanitizing:

Unlike using disinfectants, which kill virtually all viruses and bacteria identified on the product label, sanitizing doesn’t aim to kill everything on a surface. According to the CDC, “Sanitizing lowers the number of germs on surfaces or objects to a safe level, as judged by public health standards or requirements. This process works by either cleaning or disinfecting surfaces or objects to lower the risk of spreading infection.”

The EPA defines sanitizers as chemical products that can kill at least 99.9% of germs on hard surfaces.

When to Sanitize:

Sanitizers may be best for places where harmful bacteria isn’t as frequent or surfaces and objects that you’d want to keep free of powerful chemicals. After cleaning, it is often a good idea to sanitize areas such as kitchen countertops where food is frequently prepared, or objects such as cooking utensils or toys.

For more cleaning tips, or to learn more on what is the difference between cleaning sanitizing and disinfecting, contact Greenhouse Eco-Cleaning today.

5 Top Office Carpet Cleaning Tips from Our Cleaning Professionals

Office Carpet Cleaning Tips

Office carpet cleaning takes time and effort, but it’s worth keeping the carpeting looking fresh and clean for employees and clients. Determining how and when to maintain your office’s carpets through proper office carpet cleaning plan is the first step. Here are five tips for office carpet cleaning that can help.

1. Choose the right carpet and treat your high-need spaces.

Maintaining your office carpeting is a continuous process. Still, that process is a little easier if your office has a commercial-use carpet handling the heavy foot traffic that comes through. Also, having your office carpet come in neutral colors, such as grey, brown or beige, can help conceal light stains or shoe marks. Having to figure out how to get stains out of white carpets is a problem you can avoid. 

Meanwhile, areas such as bathrooms and kitchens in the office should avoid carpet all together to keep them sanitary. Of course, some high-traffic areas of your office should be cleaned more frequently than others that aren’t as busy. High-traffic regions—such as entranceways, hallways, break rooms if carpeted, watercooler, and copy areas—may require more attention. Stain guarding some of these areas is a great way to protect them from excess dirt and damage. At entryways, you can be proactive in protecting your carpets by using "scraper" mats and absorbent textiles that reduce a significant amount of damaging moisture, dirt, and dust from reaching your carpet.

2. Vacuum On a Regular Schedule.

There is perhaps no more important step to keeping your office’s carpets clean than maintaining a regular vacuuming schedule. Not only is it a critical step in refreshing the look of your carpet each day and extending its lifespan over the years, but it also protects the air quality of your office for workers by removing dirt, dust, and allergens that can build up quickly. It’s essential to ensure your maintenance team is scheduled to vacuum each day. Typically, a regular maintenance plan can even be customized to include vacuuming daily for high-traffic areas and two or three times a week for moderate traffic areas.

3. If There’s a Spill, Act On It

Unfortunately, accidents happen. Your cleaning professionals are the surest way to remove stains from carpets in your office, and the best way to avoid permanent carpet stains is to have your cleaners treat and remove any spots as soon as they can. In the meantime, make sure that carpet cleaning supplies are easily accessible in common areas for employees.

4. Surface Clean Regularly, But Add Deep Office Carpet Cleanings As Well

While daily vacuuming and surface cleaning is a must for keeping office carpets sanitary and great looking, your office carpets will sometimes benefit from deep cleanings that helps eliminate dirt, grime, or dust mites trapped below the surface. Carpet deep cleaning is recommended about once a month for high traffic areas and seasonally throughout the office.

5. Avoid Chemicals in Your Carpet Cleaning.

While cleaning or removing stains from carpet, many carpet cleaning solutions on the market include harsh chemicals, which can remain in traces in the carpet, possibly attracting dirt over time while diminishing air quality. Fortunately, cleaning companies can work with the many eco-friendly, non-toxic solutions available for cleaning your office carpets. Regardless, your cleaning professionals should know the proper methods for removing these traces after carpet cleaning.

If you want to learn more tips for office carpet cleaning and how to get stains out of carpet, contact Greenhouse Eco-Cleaning today.

What Cleans Viruses on Surfaces?

While it’s great to frequently clean our living areas with something as simple as soap and water, the current pandemic has reinforced the need to regularly disinfect these spaces to eradicate viruses. It’s important to keep up a balanced schedule of hygiene cleaning, or removing visible traces of dirt, and disinfecting, using harder-hitting cleaners that are proven and recommended by experts to kill viruses around your living space. A healthy schedule includes cleaning once a week, and disinfecting high-touch surface areas you frequent every day.

Even though SARS-CoV-2 (the pathogen that causes the new coronavirus disease) is known to spread mainly through respiratory droplets from person-to-person, the Center for Disease Control says that COVID-19 can also be picked up by touching a surface contaminated with the virus, transmitted when your hands then touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. SARS-CoV-2 can live on surfaces anywhere from hours to days depending on factors such as surface type and temperature.

Fortunately, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has created a list of nearly 400 products that they’ve approved for combating emerging pathogens, including the new coronavirus. Featured on the list are household cleaners such as bleach or hydrogen peroxide and items common on the grocery store shelves, such as Clorox disinfecting wipes (containing chlorides and isopropyl alcohol) or Lysol disinfectant spray.

And if you're looking for a more environmentally-friendly product that is effective in cleaning viruses, the good news is that EPA has included a few all-natural products containing the ingredient thymol. Thymol is naturally antimicrobial botanical, made of oil of various herbs including basil and thyme. CleanWell’s thymol product featured on the EPA’s list is alcohol-free, non-toxic, and safe for food surfaces.

If these disinfectant options are unavailable to you at the moment, another virus cleaning option that you may already have at home are alcohol solutions that contain at least 70% alcohol. You may have them in stock for use as an antiseptic. In fact, the use of alcohol-based wipes or spray containing at least 70% alcohol are usually recommended to disinfect touch screens and other high-touch electronics.

For more on what kills viruses on surfaces, and other cleaning and hygiene tips, contact Greenhouse Eco-Cleaning today. 

As an essential business, Greenhouse Eco-Cleaning is continuing to serve our customers during the COVID-19 emergency. Learn about the steps we’ve taken to protect our customers and employees and our Coronavirus Cleaning and Disinfection Services that can provide extra peace of mind during these challenging times.