Natural Cleaning Tips For Healthy Living

Create and maintain a clean environment of your very own.

4 Halloween Stoops We Love

Posted on October 27, 2016

gec_stoopdecorating

Soon little ghouls and goblins will be making their appearance on our doorsteps. Are you ready? While candy is a must (no one wants to be on the receiving end of a trick-or-treater scorned), we also love how some—especially New Yorkers—are prepping their stoops for Halloween fun. Here are our favorite stoop decorating ideas along with ways you can create a similar feel even if you are pressed for time and money:

 

gec_pumpkinsPacked with Pumpkins
We are wondering how long it took this homeowner to carve all those pumpkins! This stoop is just the right amount of scary for the littlest of visitors—cobwebs with fake spiders mixed with the more friendly pumpkins makes this a great Halloween sight.

Quick Idea: If it’s hard to find fresh pumpkins this late in the Halloween season, pick up some “craftable” ones from stores such as Target or Michaels. They are easy to carve, making them an ideal activity for families. Plus, you can save them to use again next year.

 

 

gec_yardGoing beyond the Stoop
If you are lucky enough to have some yard or garden space, don’t be afraid (no pun intended) to fill up the space with Halloween scariness. Notice the ghosts, ghouls and skeletons are not only in the tree, but up into the windows. We can only imagine how much fun this is at night.

Quick Idea: Yes, this is definitely a “go big or go home” display. However, you can achieve the same level of scariness in a big space by creating some DIY ghosts. You will need white balloons, black string, cheesecloth, and black duct tape. You will find complete instructions here. Want the ghosts to glow? Look for balloons that are glow-in-the-dark.

 

 

gec_spidersThe Cure for Arachnophobia
If you have even the slightest fear of spiders you will want to steer clear of this NYC porch. Dangling from their “webs” high above the doorway, these creatures are even scary during daylight hours. What we love about this is the use of space—we often forget to decorate “up”, especially if our porch space is tiny.

Quick Idea: If your weekend leaves little time to create gigantic spiders, create a gigantic spider web. Using clothesline style rope and some ceiling hooks (depending on your space), you can create a web big for the whole block to see. Click here for directions.

 

 

gec_gourdsReady for Thanksgiving
There really isn’t a lot of time between passing out treats and picking up turkeys. With its mixture of gourds, pumpkins and fall foliage, this porch works for Halloween and also looks good for Thanksgiving guests. You will want to make sure your gourds/pumpkins stay fresh for the whole season—click here for ideas on how to make that happen.

Quick Idea: You don’t need to decorate the entire stoop. Grab a couple of mums and a handful of gourds to decorate a planter or two by the door.

 

As always, a pumpkin or two–or even a skeleton wearing a hat (see our top photo)–is all you really need to make your stoop inviting to trick-or-treaters and Halloween guests.  Happy Halloween!

Talk to us:  Share a picture of your stoop with us on social media–Twitter or Facebook.

 

 

Top image courtesy of flickr CC/Bill Benzon

Fall Porch Ideas Halloween Halloween Decorations

Latest Posts


Notice: Undefined variable: result in /var/www/html/wp-content/themes/greenhouse/parts/blocks/blog-latest.php on line 24

How Long Does The Coronavirus Live On Surfaces?

In late 2019, SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes the illness known as COVID-19 — began spreading person-to-person, primarily through respiratory droplets produced as someone with the virus talks, coughs, or sneezes in proximity to others. 

While it is less common, touching surfaces with traces of the virus is also known as another means for transmission, and there is published research into how long the SARS-CoV-2 lasts on different surfaces. However, how long SARS-CoV-2 remains infectious on these surfaces is still unknown.

So far, two major studies have been published testing how long SARS-CoV-2 stays on surfaces:

Since March, health officials have stressed regular cleaning and disinfection of all kinds of surfaces that we touch routinely to fight the spreadCOVID-19 and regularly cleaning one's hands. With that in mind, we'll summarize how long coronavirus can live on surfaces based on these studies' findings.

How long does coronavirus live on surfaces?

  • Plastic (3-7 days)
    • Common Surfaces: Food packaging, water bottles, and milk containers, credit cards, remote controls, light switches, computer keyboards and mouses, ATM buttons.
    • The NEJM study detected the virus on plastic for up to 3 days while the Lancet detected the virus on plastic for up to 7 days.
  • Stainless Steel (3-7 days)
    • Common Surfaces: door handles, refrigerators, handrails, keys, cutlery, pots and pans, industrial equipment.
    • While the NEJM article found that the virus could remain on stainless steel after three days, researchers for the Lancet article detected it for up to 7 days.
  • Copper (Up to 4 days)
    • Common Surfaces: Coins, cookware, jewelry, electrical wires.
  • Paper (Up to 4 days)
    • Common Surfaces: Paper, money, stationery, magazines and newspapers, tissues, towels, toilet paper.
    • The Lancet study found that the virus could last three days on printed paper, while on other paper types such as money, it could last four days.
  • Glass (Up to 4 days)
    • Common Surfaces: Windows, mirrors, drinkware, screens for TVs, computers, and phones.
  • Cardboard (Up to 24 hrs)
    • Common Surfaces: Food packaging, shipping boxes.

With the information of how long the coronavirus lasts on various surfaces from these studies, it is a good idea for homes and businesses to appropriately clean and disinfect high-touch surface areas, such as kitchen or break room counters, fridges, and sinks, dining tables, doorknobs and workspaces on a set schedule. 

If you're looking for more information and tips on the most effective ways to keep your surfaces clean, contact Greenhouse Eco-Cleaning today.

Office COVID-19 Cleaning Checklist to Keep Your Employees Healthy and Safe

Once we are able to safely return to work, we'll need to consider how we regularly clean our offices and workplace facilities in ways we may not have thought of before the coronavirus (COVID-19) upended our everyday work and life routines. While anxiety about returning and sharing workspaces with co-workers is certainly understandable, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has suggested several important strategies for space-hygiene that we can adopt to promote safe, clean offices.

Along with observing social distancing, encouraging face coverings and practicing proper hygiene (regular hand washing) as part of following the CDC guidelines, this office cleaning checklist will help you update cleaning practices for your everyday work routine and a healthy work environment.

Get the Right Cleaning Tools

There are several important cleaning tools every office should have depending on different situations, such as routine cleaning, deep cleaning, or disinfection. The CDC suggests often using green cleaners and soap and water solutions for routine cleaning of surfaces, while stronger disinfectants can be used more for eradicating viruses or bacteria, particularly in spaces where a co-worker has shown signs of illness for instance. Here are a few items to mark on your checklist:

  •  PPE — maintain stocks of face masks, nitrile gloves, hand sanitizer and cleaning solutions for all employees and staff onsite.
  •  Paper towels
  •  Green/chemical-free cleaning spray
  •  Disinfectants such as wipes, spray, or bleach solution — verify disinfectants are on the EPA List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19).
  • Trash bags
  • For disinfection, stock appropriately-rated respirator masks and protective gowns

Office Cleaning Procedures

Along with updated cleaning routines, various public health organizations have suggested a few other strategies for keeping employees safe in addition to a modified cleaning routine. Some of these suggestions include:

  • Consider staggering work shift schedules where employees rotate (A/B shifts) coming into the office. This will not only limit contact and possible spread of illness but accommodate cleaning schedules and limited workstations.
  • Keep necessary cleaning supplies stocked, labeled and accessible in high-traffic areas, such as disinfectant wipes, hand sanitizer and paper towels etc.
  • Encourage employees to use the office’s cleaning supplies to wipe down surfaces in their personal workstation.
  • Provide a channel for employees to suggest improvements in space-hygiene as well as request cleaning supplies and services.
  • Consider touchless office upgrades that reduce contact at high-touch areas such as technology for touchless access into the office, as well as motion-sensing lights, towel dispensers, soap and hand sanitizer dispensers.

Recommended Office Cleaning Schedules

While every office is different and will have different cleaning needs, there are a few things to consider when it comes to cleaning routines. According to the CDC, “at least daily, clean and disinfect all surfaces that are frequently touched by multiple people.” Such high-touch areas include: 

  • High-touch surface areas typically include: 
  • Door handles
  • Desks
  • Breakroom appliances
  • Light switches
  • Bathroom Fixtures such as faucets and toilets 
  • Workstations and workstation electronics
  • Keyboards 
  • Telephones
  • Handrails
  • Printer/copiers
  • Drinking fountains

There are times your office may need to escalate its cleaning schedule and regiment during the year in terms of disinfecting surface areas and deep cleaning in the office (upholstery, window treatments, and carpets). That could include:  

  • Should a significant outbreak of transmissible illness/rise in COVID-19 cases occur in your region 
  • After any relatively large office meetings
  • During peak flu season in late fall/winter
  • Should an employee report they have a transmissible illness

Finally, any business should identify a professional cleaning company that can meet the demands of your business's cleaning needs to ensure you maintain a safe and sanitary workplace every day. They should be able to provide deep cleaning of your office spaces before your business’s re-opening and be able to continue ongoing decontamination cleaning as needed, as well as thorough routine office cleaning each day.

For more tips and details on recommended office cleaning schedules for COVID-19, or to schedule a consultation with our specialists, contact Greenhouse today.

Coronavirus Reopening: How to Mitigate the Risk of COVID-19 in Your Workplace

In the turbulent times of Covid-19, business need to make critical decisions quickly. As we all learn to navigate our new "normal" with the Covid-19 pandemic, Greenhouse remains invested in working in tandem with our New York City business community to safeguard the health of their workforce. Contact Us Today!

Making an Eco-Friendly Move

  Cardboard boxes in apartment, moving day   Boxes, tape and bubble wrap, oh my! If you have a move on the horizon or have experienced one in the recent past, you understand well that the act of moving doesn’t lend itself to eco-friendly living at first blush. So much packaging can make the least green of us shudder. Rest assured, you can remain environmentally conscious and stay committed to controlling the waste during your move, while also keeping your transport emissions down. Just follow these simple tips: Box smart. According to Move.com, the average move uses about 60 boxes (see infographic below).   That adds up to a whole lot of trees over time. Keep usage down by getting the word out about your move as early as you can. If you know folks who are making a move before yours, ask them to save all their packaging, including bubble wrap and protective packing paper, so you can reuse it during your own move. Choose box alternatives. Before you buy new boxes for your move, make sure you’ve exhausted all possible resources for box alternatives. Pack in empty large plastic bins you own, borrow from friends or ask your mover if they supply or rent reusable bins. Not only is this a great green option, it takes some of the work off your plate as movers drop bins off ahead of time and take them away after the move. No need to break down boxes or recycle them, you can move on to decorating your new home. Fuel emissions. The size and distance of your move makes all the difference when it comes to emission of CO2. When interviewing moving companies, be on the lookout for green options such as these:
  • Fuel type—ask each company what type of fuel they use. Many organizations have converted trucks to biodiesel fuel, an upgrade that helps reduce your move’s carbon footprint.
  • Car shipping—if you’re moving an automobile, price out both truck and rail shipping options. Train transport can represent huge savings to you and lighten the moving truck’s load on the road.
  • Clean out before you move—whatever you can do to reduce the number of goods you plan to move will make a big impact on related emissions. Don’t pack mindlessly and hurriedly, instead, think about items you can donate before making your move.
Get things clean.  Make sure you leave your old space clean and healthy for the next inhabitants.  Use eco-friendly cleaning products for floors, countertops, and windows or hire an eco-friendly cleaning company—like us!—to come in and take care of dirt, dust, and debris. Grab this great online checklist from our friends at MakeSpace for all your pre- and post-cleaning tasks.   Talk to us: Have you made an environmentally conscious move in recent months? Share what you learned and your best tips for other readers below.

As an essential business, Greenhouse Eco-Cleaning is continuing to serve our customers during the COVID-19 emergency. Learn about the steps we’ve taken to protect our customers and employees and our Coronavirus Cleaning and Disinfection Services that can provide extra peace of mind during these challenging times.